Thanksgiving Traditions

I wanted to share these recipes because whenever I post them people always ask about them.  These are old school recipes that I love because they are part of our family traditions, even though they are so unlike what I usually do.  Make no mistake, these are the kind of recipes that you enjoy once a year, definitely not health oriented but they are soul food!  .

Roy’s Sausage Sage Stuffing (from the Chicago Tribune Cookbook) This recipe is dog eared from a Chicago Tribune newspaper from 1990!

Sausage Sage Stuffing

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  • 4 loaves (1 pound each) sliced white bread
  • 2 pounds sliced bacon
  • 2 pounds bulk pork sausage with sage
  • 2 medium onions, sliced
  • 4 ribs celery, diced
  • 1/2 cup unsalted butter
  • 7 cups chicken or turkey stock (the original recipe calls for 3-4 cups, but I ended up using 7 total)
  • 1/4 cup rubbed sage
  • 2 1/2 tablespoons poultry seasoning
  • 1 teaspoon ground pepper
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt

Cut the bread into 3/4″ – 1″ cubes and let stand, uncovered, at room temperature, overnight to allow the bread to try out.  (if you don’t have time the night before – you can bake the cubes in a 200°F oven, stirring often, until dry, about 45-60 minutes)

Dice the bacon, onions and celery and place all of it into a large, deep skillet with sausage.  Cook until thoroughly browned, 30-45 minutes.  Drain the fat off occasionally as it cooks.  When fully cooked, drain the remaining fat.  Transfer drained mixture into a large bowl.  Do not wash the skillet.

Melt butter in the same skillet.  Add 1 cup of stock and heat to a simmer, scraping up the brown bits from the bottom of the skillet.  Cool slightly.

Add the bread, sage, poultry seasoning, pepper and salt to the sausage and bacon mixture.  Pour some of the stock mixture from the skillet and toss everything lightly.  Gradually add the remaining stock until the desired texture is reached.  (You may need to use more stock to get the right consistency. This stuffing is not crumbly, you won’t see a lot of individual pieces of bread when it’s fully mixed.)

Taste and adjust seasoning as desired.  The stuffing can be made ahead of time if you’d like.  Just cover tightly and refrigerate overnight.  Bake in a large baking pan at 350°F for about 50-60 minutes.

Grandma Pat's Stuffing

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  • 5 1/2 “rows” of Saltine crackers
  • 3 cups chopped onion
  • 6 cups chicken or turkey stock (the original recipe called for much list, but 6 cups gave me the right consistency.)
  • 3 1/2 sticks butter (can you believe it? It’s an artery clogger, but it was my mother!)
  • 3 1/4 cups chopped celery
  • Dried sage
  • 2-3 Tablespoons chopped parsley
  • Celery salt to taste
  • 2 handfuls of Pepperidge Farm stuffing (store bought stuffing so not necessary, but we do it anyway!)
  • Optional: sauted, chopped gizzards

Preheat oven to 350°F.

In a large bowl, crush all of the saltine crackers into rough, large, uneven pieces.  Add in the Pepperidge Farm stuffing.

Chop the onion and celery.  Over medium heat, melt butter and saute the onions and celery until translucent.

Add the onion, celery and butter mixture to the crackers.  Gradually add the stock to the mixture, tossing together.  You might want to add more until you get to the consistency you like. (if you are adding gizzards, this is where you want to mix them in.)  Add seasoning to taste.  Mix well and place in a large baking pan.  Bake at 350° for about 1 hour.

Raspberry Jello Mold

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  • 2 large packages of raspberry Jello-O
  • 4 1/2 cups regular or unsweetened apple sauce
  • 2 bags of frozen raspberries
  • 4 cups of hot water
  • 1 1/2 cups + 1 Tbsp very cold water

Bring water to boil and turn off heat.  Pour in the two packages of Jello-O and stir well.  Then add cold water and stir well again until combined. Transfer o a large mixing bowl.

Add the apple sauce and stir, then add the raspberries and stir, making sure all of the ingredients are combined.

Lightly spray mold with non stick cooking spray. Pour mixture into a mold (a bundt pan works great!) and chill until set.  When ready to serve, loosen gently from the pan with a knife.  If it doesn’t not slide out easily, dip the bottom of the pan into a sink of warm water for 10 seconds.

 

1 thought on “Thanksgiving Traditions

  1. Love this plate! Where can I find it?

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